40 years of Audi five-cylinder engines

1976: first five-cylinder gasoline engine in the automotive industry

In August 1976, Audi introduces the second-generation Audi 100 (C2) in Luxembourg. For the first time, power is provided by a five-cylinder gasoline engine in a model from the brand with the four rings. The fuel-injected engine with a displacement of 2,144 cc develops 110 kW (136 hp) at 5,700 revolutions per minute. The maximum torque of 185 newton meters (136.45 lb-ft) is available at 4,200 rpm. The market launch of the Audi 100 (C2) follows in March 1977. From September 1979, the five-cylinder engine is also available in the Audi 200; from August 1982, it is fitted in the successor to the C2, the Audi 100 C3.

This Picture: Audi 100 GLS 5E (C2), model year 1979

1978: five-cylinder carbureted engine

In April 1978, the five-cylinder carbureted version with an output of 85 kW (115 hp) replaces the basic twoliter four-cylinder version in the Audi 100 (C2). The new 1.9-liter unit produces maximum power at 5,400 revs and delivers 154 newton meters (113.58 lb-ft) of torque to the crankshaft at 3,700 rpm. The engine is used in the Audi 100 5 (C2), the Audi 80 CD (B2), the Audi Coupé GT 5S (B2) and in the Audi 100 (C3).

This picture: Audi 80 CD (B2), model year 1982

1978: first five-cylinder diesel

In 1978, Audi presents its first diesel model for the Audi 100 (C2). The five-cylinder naturally aspirated engine with a displacement of two liters develops 51 kW (70 hp) and 123 newton meters (90.72 lb-ft) of torque. It also powers the next-generation C3, propelling both the sedans and the Avant versions. From 1984, there is a turbocharged engine with an output of 64 kW (87 hp) and 172 newton meters (126.86 lb-ft) of torque.

This picture: Audi 100 GL 5D (C2), model year 1978

1980: five-cylinder gasoline engine with turbocharger

In 1980, the Audi 200 5T (C2) comes on to the market, which is powered by the first turbocharged gasoline engine from the brand with the four rings. From a displacement of 2,144 cc, the five-cylinder unit produces 125 kW (170 hp) at 5,300 revolutions per minute and 265 newton meters (195.45 lb-ft) of torque at 3,300 rpm. The Audi 200 5T (C2) is the first Audi in the luxury class and features the lavish equipment of the Audi 100 CD as standard.

This picture: Audi 200 5T (C2), model year 1981

1980: five-cylinder gasoline engine with turbocharger and intercooler

In 1980 at the Geneva Motor Show, Audi unveils the Audi quattro (B2), known as the “Ur-quattro” from the mid-1990s. It uses the powerplant from the Audi 200 5T (C2), but features an intercooler. As a result, the turbocharged engine achieves a higher output of 147 kW (200 hp) at 5,500 revolutions per minute and 285 newton meters (210.21 lb-ft) of torque at 3,500 rpm. The body of the Audi quattro is based on the Audi Coupe (B2), which in turn is based on the Audi 80. Flared fenders, bulkier bumpers and sills as well as a larger rear spoiler distinguish the Audi quattro from the Coupe.

This picture: Audi quattro (B2), model year 1980 (Geneva Motor Show)

1983: five-cylinder engine triumphant in rallying

In the 1983 Corsica Rally, Audi competes for the first time with the Audi quattro A2, Group B. Its 2.1-liter turbocharged five-cylinder inline engine produces 265 kW (360 hp) at 6,500 revolutions per minute and delivers 450 newton meters (331.90 lb-ft) of torque at 4,000 rpm. At the end of the season, the Finn Hannu Mikkola wins the drivers’ title in this car. One year later, the Swede Stig Blomqvist replicates this success: he becomes world rally champion, while Audi wins the manufacturers’ world rally championship for the second time after 1982.

This picture: Audi quattro A2, Group B, model year 1983

1983: five-cylinder gasoline engine with four-valve technology, turbocharger and intercooler

In September 1983, Audi presents the Audi Sport quattro (B2) at the International Motor Show in Frankfurt am Main. It is powered by a 2.1-liter highperformance engine with four-valve technology that produces 225 kW (306 hp) at 6,700 revolutions per minute. The maximum torque of 350 newton meters (258.15 lb-ft) is available at 3,700 rpm. Delivery commences in May 1984. The Audi Sport quattro (B2) is a special series limited to 214 vehicles, produced to meet homologation requirements for rallying. The rules stipulate that displacement must be limited to a maximum of 2,133 cc.

This picture: Audi Sport quattro (B2), model year 1984

1984: map-controlled five-cylinder gasoline engine with emissions control as standard

In 1984, a completely new development appears. Audi is the first manufacturer to optimize the five-cylinder engine with a fully electronic map-controlled ignition system and a catalytic converter as standard. From 2,309 cc, it produces 100 kW (136 hp) at 5,600 rpm and 188 newton meters (138.66 lb-ft) of torque at 3,500 revolutions per minute. The most widely used five-cylinder engine from Audi is found in the Audi 100 2.3E (C3), the Audi Coupe 2.3E (B3) and in the Audi 90 2.3 E (B3). From 1990, it also powers the Audi 100 2.3E (C4) and a year later the Audi 80 2.3E (B4) and the Audi Cabriolet 2.3E. Here, it delivers 98 kW (133 hp) at 5,600 revolutions per minute and 186 newton meters (137.19 lb-ft) at 4,000 rpm.

This picture: Audi Coupé 2.3E (B3), model year 1989

1987: world record at Pikes Peak with the Audi Sport quattro S1 (E2)

In 1987, Walter Röhrl wins the legendary Pikes Peak Hill Climb (USA) in the Audi Sport quattro S1 (E2), setting a new record. In 10 minutes and 47.85 seconds he conquers the almost 20-kilometer-long (12.43 mi) course with 156 bends and a difference in altitude of 1,439 meters (4721.13 ft). The 2.1-liter five-cylinder engine in the Audi Sport quattro S1 (E2) delivers 440 kW (598 hp) at 8,000 revolutions per minute and produces 590 newton meters (435.16 lb-ft) of torque at 5,500 rpm.

This picture: Audi Sport quattro S1 (E2), model year 1987

1988: five-cylinder gasoline engine with four-valve technology, turbocharger and catalytic converter (S engine)

With two catalytic converters, four-valve technology, a closed tank venting system and a diagnostic system, this powerplant offers a very high standard of emissions control and technology. It is first available in the Audi 200 quattro 20V (C3), then in the Audi quattro 20V (B2) a year later and in the Audi S2 Coupe (B3) in 1990. The five-cylinder turbocharged engine has a displacement of 2,226 cc and delivers 162 kW (220 hp) at 5,700 revolutions per minute and 309 newton meters (227.91 lb-ft) of torque at 1,950 rpm.

This picture: Audi 200 quattro 20V (C3), model year 1990

1989: most powerful five-cylinder works engine in motorsport

At the 1989 IMSA GTO in the USA, the Audi 90 quattro competes in its races with the most powerful fivecylinder works engine. The turbocharged aluminum engine is a 2.2-liter high-performance unit specially designed for racing. It develops 530 kW (720 hp) at 7,500 revolutions per minute and delivers 720 newton meters (531.04 lb-ft) of torque at 6,000 rpm. Overall, the Audi 90 quattro IMSA GTO wins seven races in the American touring car series in the 1989 season.

This picture: Audi 90 quattro IMSA GTO, model year 1989

1989: first five-cylinder turbocharged direct-injection diesel engine in a production car

Audi presents another milestone in the automotive history in 1989 at the International Motor Show in Frankfurt am Main: the Audi 100 TDI. The first fivecylinder turbocharged diesel with direct injection for a production car produces 88 kW (120 hp) from a displacement of 2.5 liters and delivers 265 newton meters (195.45 lb-ft) of torque to the crankshaft. It is used in the C3 and in the C4 – from 1994 with an output of 103 kW (140 hp) and 290 newton meters (213.89 lb-ft) of torque.

This picture: Audi 100 TDI (C3), model year 1990

1991: performance-enhanced five-cylinder S engine with overboost control

In the 1991 Audi S4, the Sport version of the Audi 100 (C4), a turbocharged 2.2-liter 20-valve five-cylinder inline engine is at work. It develops 169 kW (230 hp) at 5,900 rpm. Thanks to a brief increase in boost pressure, a peak torque of 350 newton meters (258.15) is achieved at 1,950 revolutions per minute. The engine also powers the Audi S2 Avant (B4) and the Audi S2 Coupé (B3). In 1994, the Audi S4 becomes known as the Audi S6.

This picture: Audi S2 Avant (B4), model year 1992

1994: first five-cylinder RS engine

In 1994, the most powerful five-cylinder production engine built by Audi to date goes into action in the Audi Avant RS 2 (B4). With turbocharging, fuel injection and standard-fit emissions control, it produces 232 kW (315 hp) at 6,500 revolutions per minute from a displacement of 2,226 cc and delivers 410 newton meters (302.40 lb-ft) of torque at 3,000 rpm.

This picture: Audi Avant RS 2 (B4), model year 1994

2009: 2.5 TFSI with gasoline direct injection, turbocharger and intercooler

30 years after the first five-cylinder turbocharged gasoline engine was presented, Audi once again introduces a model with a five-cylinder gasoline engine and turbocharger at the Geneva Motor Show: the TT RS. The powerplant delivers 250 kW (340 hp) at 6,500 revolutions per minute from 2,480 cc and 450 newton meters (331.90 lb-ft) at 5,300 rpm. From 2011, this engine is also used in the RS 3 Sportback and from 2014 in the updated RS Q3. In the 2012 TT RS plus, the engine produces 265 kW (360 hp) at 6,700 revolutions per minute and develops 465 newton meters (342.97 lb-ft) of torque at 5,400 rpm.

This picture: Audi TT RS Roadster, model year 2009

2009: 2.5 TFSI with gasoline direct injection, turbocharger and intercooler

30 years after the first five-cylinder turbocharged gasoline engine was presented, Audi once again introduces a model with a five-cylinder gasoline engine and turbocharger at the Geneva Motor Show: the TT RS. The powerplant delivers 250 kW (340 hp) at 6,500 revolutions per minute from 2,480 cc and 450 newton meters (331.90 lb-ft) at 5,300 rpm. From 2011, this engine is also used in the RS 3 Sportback and from 2014 in the updated RS Q3. In the 2012 TT RS plus, the engine produces 265 kW (360 hp) at 6,700 revolutions per minute and develops 465 newton meters (342.97 lb-ft) of torque at 5,400 rpm.

This picture: Audi RS 3 Sportback, model year 2011

2010: Audi TT RS in races

In 2010, Audi starts its motorsport activities with the TT RS. The racing car developed for endurance racing is powered by the five-cylinder engine from the production model. Following improvements to the intercooler and exhaust system, the powerplant delivers 280 kW (380 hp) at 5,800 revolutions per minute. The maximum torque of 500 newton meters (368.78 lb-ft) develops at 2,500 rpm. In the VLN Endurance Championship of 2010 and 2011, the frontwheel-drive racing car notches up several victories in the SP4T class up to 2.5 liters’ capacity. In August 2011, it clinches overall victory in the 6-hour race on the Nürburgring. Audi achieves further success with the TT RS in the 24-hour race in the Eifel in 2011, where it takes class victory.

This picture: Audi TT RS racing car, model year 2011

2015: 2.5 TFSI with gasoline direct injection, turbocharger and intercooler

In the summer of 2015, the second-generation RS 3 Sportback* appears – the most powerful car in the premium compact segment with an output of 270 kW (367 hp). The combination of turbocharging and direct injection permits a high compression ratio of 10:1 and correspondingly good efficiency. The five-cylinder inline engine delivers a maximum of 465 newton meters (342.97 lb-ft) to the crankshaft. This torque is available from as low as 1,625 revolutions per minute and remains constant up to 5,550 rpm. Since spring 2016, Audi has been using the optimized version of the powerplant in the Audi RS Q3 performance* too.

This picture: Audi RS 3 Sportback, model year 2015

2015: 2.5 TFSI with gasoline direct injection, turbocharger and intercooler

In the summer of 2015, the second-generation RS 3 Sportback* appears – the most powerful car in the premium compact segment with an output of 270 kW (367 hp). The combination of turbocharging and direct injection permits a high compression ratio of 10:1 and correspondingly good efficiency. The five-cylinder inline engine delivers a maximum of 465 newton meters (342.97 lb-ft) to the crankshaft. This torque is available from as low as 1,625 revolutions per minute and remains constant up to 5,550 rpm. Since spring 2016, Audi has been using the optimized version of the powerplant in the Audi RS Q3 performance* too.

This picture: Audi RS Q3 performance, model year 2016

2016: 2.5 TFSI with gasoline direct injection, turbocharger and intercooler

At the Beijing Motor Show in 2016, Audi presents the new TT RS Coupe* and the new TT RS Roadster*. The five-cylinder unit has been enhanced in every area – with lightweight construction measures, reduced internal friction, increased power delivery. From an unchanged displacement of 2,480 cc, the turbocharged engine gains a good 17 percent increase in performance. With an output of 294 kW (400 hp) it is more potent than ever before. The maximum torque of 480 newton meters (354.03 lb-ft) is available between 1,700 and 5,850 revolutions per minute. It ensures outstanding pulling power, which accompanies the unmistakable five-cylinder sound.

This picture: Audi TT RS Coupé, model year 2016

Audi & FC Bayern Munich – Picking Teams

Audi & FC Bayern Munich - Picking Teams

Life is better connected.

The soccer stars of FCB München choose their own street teams of New Yorkers for a one off 5-a-side match. While the 2 teams of soccer stars are driving through the streets of New York City, they are searching with the help of Audi’s connect technology, people to play in their team. They hand out shirts, as an invitation to the great match. When the night time falls, the selected players and the football stars face each other on a floodlight pitch.

Who will pick the best team?

#pickingteams #audi #fcbayern #newyork

Audi and the FIA WEC break new ground in Mexico

Thrilling atmosphere in thin air – this awaits the drivers for the fifth WEC race in Mexico. Five of the six Audi drivers have already experienced the huge enthusiasm triggered by motorsport in the Central American country when they raced earlier in their careers. André Lotterer (D) raced here 14 years ago in the ChampCar series. “The fans screamed so loud and excitedly that I had to cover my ears during the driver parade,” remembers Lotterer. Marcel Fässler (CH) and Oliver Jarvis (GB) experienced the enthusiastic fans nine years ago in the A1GP championship – Jarvis even flew home with a winner’s trophy. And last March, Lucas di Grassi (BR) and Loïc Duval (BR) raved about the public’s warm reception after the FIA Formula E race in Mexico. The unusual track also runs through a baseball stadium. “It was just incredible what was happening in the grandstands,” said di Grassi and Duval. Benoît Tréluyer (F) is the only Audi driver never to have competed in Mexico in his career. The Frenchman returns alongside Fässler and Lotterer in the Audi R18 cockpit in September. The 39-year old professional was forced to take a break at the Nürburgring following a cycling accident.

The six-hour race makes great demands of the six drivers’ fitness. The Autódromo Hermanos Rodríguez lies at an altitude of almost 2,300 meters. As a result, the air is about 25 to 30 per cent thinner than at sea level. The Audi Sport engineers have prepared meticulously for this. The Audi R18 diesel hybrid sports car reaches higher speeds on the straights, as the air resistance sinks. In turn, the lower air density is a disadvantage in corners: “A correspondingly large amount of downforce is lost, which is generated by the air flow,” explains Jan Monchaux, Head of Aerodynamics at Audi Sport. “This is why we set every possible aerodynamic aid on the body for maximum downforce.” The engine is also affected by the thinner air. The V6 TDI power plant is supplied with air by a turbocharger. Up to now, this has compressed the intake air fourfold, for Mexico the regulations now permit five times the value. Thus, the altitude-related loss of power can to a large extent be compensated for. “However, the higher compression also increases the charge air temperature, which is why we run with adapted cooling,” says Ulrich Baretzky, Head of Engine Development at Audi Sport. A high-altitude application for the engine electronics completes the changes. 

Audi Motorsport Newsletter 31/2016

A word from … Lucas di Grassi

As Brazilian, you are the only Audi driver from an American country. The FIA WEC makes its debut shortly in Mexico, where you have already raced in another series this year. What are you expecting from next weekend?

We were in Mexico with the FIA Formula E in March. The event was just amazing. There were an enormous amount of spectators, but I think that even more spectators will be there for the FIA WEC. However, it’s not just about the sheer numbers. The fans are extremely enthusiastic. The Mexicans love motorsport and are looking forward to the WEC, in which a Mexican team also competes. The spectators bring a huge amount of energy with them to this race. I’m sure that we’ll have an unforgettable weekend together with them. And we also want to reward them with a great race.

What’s special about the track?

The sector through the stadium is unique. It’s unbelievable for us drivers to race through such a fabulously built spectator backdrop. I expect there to be many exciting maneuvers in the race, which will impress the fans. With the exception of one corner and the pit lane, the circuit is however completely different to the Formula E track we used six months ago. We use the entire facility and race on the 4.3 kilometer long version. At one point we reach around 300 km/h.

What will be the biggest challenge in Mexico?

The track is at an altitude of almost 2,300 meters. This alone makes it a challenge for our technicians because the air is much thinner. The aerodynamics, engine power and the cooling system are affected the most. It will also be physically more demanding for us drivers. Even so, I’m really looking forward to our debut in Mexico.

Coming up next week

02–04/09 Mexiko (MEX), round 5, FIA WEC
03/09 Nürburgring (D), round 7, VLN
02–03/09 Zolder (B), rounds 11 and 12, DMV GTC
02–04/09 Barcelona (E), round 6, International Endurance Series, 24-hour race
02–04/09 Sepang (MAL), round 3, Asian Le Mans Sprint Cup
02–04/09 Shanghai (CN), rounds 9 and 10, GT Asia

– End –

Thomas M. Müller succeeds Ricky Hudi as Head of Electronics at Audi

Chairman of the Board of Management of AUDI AG, Rupert Stadler, thanks Hudi: “With regards to automotive electronic innovations Audi is one of the world’s leading companies.” Under his leadership, the networking of the car was advanced decisively and a technology lead built up in the area of Autonomous Driving. Also with regards to battery and lighting technology Hudi was able to achieve trendsetting work. In the area of semiconductor technology he established important cooperation, for example with Nvidia in the area of graphics processing units.

Dr. Thomas M. Müller was born in 1971 in Dudweiler and studied Physics. He started his professional career in 1999 at BMW Group in Munich. There he worked internationally in different strategic and operative management positions, for example in the development of electrical and electronic systems. In the area of business IT Müller accelerated the digitization of business processes. From 2009 to 2012 he was Director Connected Car at BMW Group.

Subsequently, Müller went on to Volvo Car Group as the Vice President Electrical & Electronic Systems Engineering. In 2014 he additionally took over responsibility for the unit E-Propulsion (electric drive). Since 2015 he has held the position of Vice President Electrics/Electronics & Chassis. Starting December 2016, Dr. Thomas M. Müller will take up his new function at Audi. “Thomas Müller is a proven expert in the areas of automotive electrics and electronics and will continue to advance the digitization and networking of our products,” says Audi Board Member for Technical Development, Dr. Stefan Knirsch.

Ricky Hudi, born 1968 in Redwood City, Silicon Valley, started his professional career at BMW and joined AUDI AG in 1997. There he headed pre-development in the area of Electrics/Electronics. In early 2000 he became Head of Development for Infotainment, where he introduced systems developed in pre-development – primarily Audi MMI – into series production. In October 2003 Ricky Hudi transferred within Audi from Development to Production, where he was Head of Electrics/Electronics Production until August 2008. Since January 2009 he has been Executive Vice President Development Electrics/Electronics AUDI AG and has continuously set new standards.

Audi starts transmission production in China

Audi will produce 240,000 transmissions annually at the new facility and will have a work force of over 1,000 at full capacity. And thanks to the modular production set-up, the company can double the plant’s capacity in a later phase. “With our first local transmission plant, we have brought another key Audi competence to China,” says Joachim Wedler, President of Audi China. “The transmission production in Tianjin marks a milestone in our localization strategy.”

The factory is also particularly sustainable: It has, among other things, a heat recovery system and a roof that is designed to save power through the intelligent use of daylight.

The new 7-speed S tronic transmission from Tianjin will be used in models of the second-generation modular longitudinal platform (MLB). It combines sporty and comfortable driving with low fuel consumption. In combination with the 2.0 TFSI engine, the gearbox contributes to the class-leading efficiency and performance of the powertrain of the new Audi A4 L. The new generation of the premium mid-size sedan will be launched in China in September and features the lowest CO2 emissions in its segment.

The Volkswagen Group has produced dual-clutch transmissions for models based on the modular transverse platform (MQB) since 2014. The start of production in Tianjin marks the completion of the second phase of Volkswagen ATJ. AUDI AG (49 percent) and Volkswagen Group China (51 percent) are both shareholders of the company. “Volkswagen Automatic Transmission Tianjin creates synergies between the Group brands, further strengthening them. With efficient use of resources we live up to our promise of sustainability at every step along the way,” says Dr. Jochem Heizmann, President of Volkswagen Group China.

Audi has been active in China since 1988 and has since led the country’s premium segment. The Audi joint venture FAW‑Volkswagen produces the models Audi A6 L, Audi A4 L, Audi Q5* and Audi Q3* in Changchun in northern China. The joint venture plant in Foshan in the south of China produces the Audi A3 Sportback* and the Audi A3 Sedan*.

Fuel consumption of the models named above:

Audi Q5:
Combined fuel consumption in l/100 km: 7.9 – 4.8 (29.8 – 49.0 US mpg);**
Combined CO2 emissions in g/km: 181 – 126 (291.3 – 202.8 g/mi)**

Audi Q3:
Combined fuel consumption in l/100 km: 8.6 – 4.2 (27.4 – 56.0 US mpg);**
Combined CO2 emissions in g/km: 203 – 109 (326.7 – 175.4 g/mi)**

Audi A3 Sportback:
Combined fuel consumption in l/100 km: 7.1 – 3.8 (33.1 – 61.9 US mpg);**
Combined CO2 emissions in g/km: 163 – 99 (262.3 – 159.3 g/mi)**

Audi A3 Sedan:
Combined fuel consumption in l/100 km: 7.1 – 3.7 (33.1 – 63.6 US mpg);**
Combined CO2 emissions in g/km: 163 – 98 (262.3 – 157.7 g/mi)**

**Fuel consumption and CO2 emission figures given in ranges depend on the tires/wheels used as well as the engine/transmission version.

FC Bayern starts the season with Audi

As always, for the squad of Manuel Neuer, Jérôme Boateng and Franck Ribéry the event in Ingolstadt was a highlight in its preparation for the new Bundesliga season that kicks off on Friday night. And hundreds of fans from the region, plus numerous Audi employees had the opportunity to see their stars at close range and to get autographs. For Coach Carlo Ancelotti it was the first visit to Ingolstadt.

FC Bayern München and Audi have been forming a team since the summer of 2002 and are now starting their 15th joint season. Highlights of the partnership include the Audi Cup that has been held as a preparatory tournament at the Allianz Arena every two years since 2009 or the Audi Summer Tour abroad. Just a few weeks ago, the brand accompanied Bayern’s training camp to the United States where the team met with AC Milan, Inter Milan and Real Madrid.

The squad’s choice of favorite cars reflects true team spirit, with 15 players opting for an Audi RS 6* (including Holger Badstuber, Xabi Alonso and Thiago Alcántara) and an Audi RS 7* (including Mats Hummels, Franck Ribéry and Robert Lewandowski) as particularly sporty models. New signing Renato Sanches selected a perfect car for urban traffic, the Audi A3 Sportback. Coach Carlo Ancelotti had already received his Audi S8 plus* in July.

– End –

Audi Motorsport Newsletter 30/2016

A word from … Edoardo Mortara

The Audi driver about weeks with plenty of variety and the two DTM races at the Moscow Raceway.

The birth of your daughter, 24 Hours of Spa, a victory in the Audi R8 LMS Cup in Asia and the DTM in Russia – You’ve had a lot going on in your life since Zandvoort …

First of all, the personal aspects have to be separated from working life. The birth of our daughter on July 19 was a defining moment for my wife and me. On the sporting side, I had the opportunity to drive a couple of GT races which I always enjoy a lot. In the 24-hour race at Spa, I competed for the first time. That’s a great race with a tremendous atmosphere. The team was fantastic too. My commitment in the Audi R8 LMS Cup for Phoenix Racing Asia at Sepang also went really well. So, I’ve had a good time.

Back to the DTM: why was Audi struggling so much in both qualifying sessions at the Moscow Raceway?

Honestly, I’ve always had the impression that BMW was playing with us and showed their real potential this weekend. But we also need to analyze why in qualifying – especially on Sunday – we were so far away from being in contention. We rather have to look for the problem with us than with the others.

The two races highly differed from each other, with rain on Saturday and the comeback on Sunday. Your assessment?

I think I showed a strong performance in both races. On Saturday, I should have finished a little farther in front, but I’m happy about having scored points in both races.

On Sunday, you overtook a lot of cars. What was the best overtaking maneuver?

That’s hard to say. I had a couple of good maneuvers on Saturday as well. On Sunday, it was great fun starting from the rear and advancing to sixth place.

How was the last turn from your perspective?

I tried to make up another position. Unfortunately, that didn’t work. The way Robert (Wickens) drove was very fair and I didn’t want any contact with him. In the end, we crossed the line side by side with a gap of 0.0 seconds …

With a 30-point deficit separating you from Marco Wittmann, what’s still possible in the last six DTM races?

Everything.

Coming up next week
26–27/08 Le Castellet (F), round 4, GT3 Le Mans Cup
26–28/08 Virginia (USA), round 9, IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship
26–28/08 Budapest (H), round 4, Blancpain GT Series Sprint Cup
26–28/08 Sydney (AUS), round 2, Australian Endurance Championship
27–28/08 Suzuka (J), round 5, Super GT

Comeback by Edoardo Mortara at Moscow

In the battle for the best grid positions in the morning, none of the eight Audi drivers managed the leap into the top ten. Youngster Nico Müller in the Playboy Audi RS 5 DTM in position twelve was the best Audi driver on the grid. The title hopefuls Edoardo Mortara and Jamie Green (Hoffmann Group Audi RS 5 DTM/Audi Sport Team Rosberg) even had to settle for grid positions 17 and 19. “We didn’t manage to get the tires to work precisely the way they should have in qualifying,” said Dieter Gass, Head of DTM at Audi Sport. “The right compromise between a fast lap in qualifying and the long race distance is difficult sometimes. We need to carefully analyze this.”

In the race, the Audi RS 5 DTM then were among the fastest cars, which Nico Müller’s fastest lap proved as well. With a total of four drivers in the points Audi still managed to score a respectable result in the light of the difficult starting base.

The man of the race was Edoardo Mortara. The Italian made up five positions right on lap one and subsequently continued to thrill the spectators with spectacular overtaking maneuvers. On the penultimate lap, he bumped Mercedes-Benz driver Daniel Juncadella from position six. In the last turn, Mortara still attacked Saturday’s winner Robert Wickens as well and saw the checkered flag in a photo finish alongside the Mercedes-Benz. On the finish line, Mortara was short merely 67 thousandths of a second from position five.

“It was a good race for me. I gave my best,” said Mortara following his comeback. “Initially, I was struggling quite a bit with the new set of tires. But then grip came and I was able to close the gap to the guys in front of me. I tried to put pressure on them and that worked out pretty well. Obviously, having had a number of Audi cars around me helped today too. That was good teamwork and a nice feeling.”

Behind Mortara three other Audi drivers, Nico Müller, Adrien Tambay (Speedweek.com Audi RS 5 DTM) and Mattias Ekström (Red Bull Audi RS 5 DTM), who drove a similarly strong race as the Italian, finished in the points. Miguel Molina at the wheel of the Teufel Audi RS 5 DTM in position eleven missed scoring a point in the thrilling finale by only 0.107 seconds. Timo Scheider (AUTO BILD MOTORSPORT Audi RS 5 DTM) and Mike Rockenfeller (Schaeffler Audi RS 5 DTM, both Audi Sport Team Phoenix) advanced from grid positions 23 and 20 to 13th and 15th place.

DTM front runners moving together even closer

Rain determined the action on the race track near Moscow on Saturday. A preliminary decision was made in the morning’s qualifying session. After Audi had been battling for pole position for a long time, Mattias Ekström in the Red Bull Audi RS 5 DTM of Audi Sport Team Abt Sportsline in the end had to settle for grid position five as the best Audi driver, and the title hopefuls, Jamie Green (Hoffmann Group Audi RS 5 DTM/Audi Sport Team Rosberg) and Edoardo Mortara (Castrol EDGE Audi RS 5 DTM), even for positions ten and twelve.

Due to heavy rain, the race directors decided to send the field into the race behind the Audi R8 safety car. This meant that the Audi drivers had no opportunity to make up ground at the start. While Mattias Ekström defended his fifth place after the race was released, Jamie Green and Edoardo Mortara went on to battle their way forward to positions seven and eight in difficult conditions, which earned them valuable points. With Timo Scheider in the AUTO BILD MOTORSPORT Audi RS 5 DTM in position nine, Audi Sport Team Phoenix scored points as well.

“The championship has become even closer after this race,” said Dieter Gass, Head of DTM at Audi Sport. “In the teams’ classification, we’re in front again, in the manufacturers’ classification, we’re trailing Mercedes-Benz by only five points and in the drivers’ classification, Jamie (Green) merely has a four-point deficit separating him from Robert (Wickens). That’ll be very exciting tomorrow. Following a less than perfect qualifying for us, it was difficult to achieve more from these grid positions. The safety car start didn’t help us either because in rain the start offers one of the best overtaking opportunities. I think we extracted the best from the grid positions and showed a good team performance in the race.”